Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter is an 1850 romantic work of fiction in a historical setting, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is considered to be his magnum opus.[1] Set in 17th-century Puritan Boston, Massachusetts during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an adulterous affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

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7 responses

  1. Hello all,

    This book, unlike the other ones we have read, was written many many years ago. So the original version is free of copyright (in Spain this is after 50 years of author’s death, internationally varies). So there are plenty of places where you can find an electronic version for your e-reader, like the Project Gutengerg http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/33 .

    Let’s start reading…

    Ramon

  2. Started to read last weekend … and have to say it is a VERY DENSE BOOK … has 42 lines per page, very small font, large phrases … Not ans easy to read book, not. After first chapter, had to go to spanish version, as I wasnt shure I understood what the author ment …
    Sebastian doesn’t like this book either

    1. For me is also very difficult to follow and understand this book. I try to read but I’m very slow, for the moment I don’t get into it.

  3. Here is the moment (page 25) when the protagonist finds an interesting document, and we get ONE single phrase lasting 14 lines (!!!) :

    Poking and burrowing into the heaped-up rubbish in the corner, unfolding one and another document, and reading the names of vessels that had long ago foundered at sea or rotted at the wharves, and those of merchants, never heard of now on ‘Change, nor very readily decipherable on their mossy tombstones; glancing at such matters with the saddened, weary, half-reluctant interest which we bestow on the corpse of dead activity – and exerting my fancy, sluggish with little use, to raise up from these dry bones an image of the old town’s brighter aspect, when India was a new region, and only Salem knew the way thither – I chanced to lay my hand on a small package, carefully done up in a piece of ancient yellow parchment.

    Artificial, let me say. Sebastian.

  4. Carles Segura | Reply

    Carles Segura; Ok! Looks like I forget my loggin parametres
    ——-

    Hey everybody,

    I’m afraid that I’ll skip this meeting.

    We’re planning to left Torrelles at 17 PM so I won’t be able to attend.

    About the book:

    Well, I haven’t been able, this month, to read. Nor this book, nor nothing at all.
    Just a few pages about the “Custom House” and his peculiar characters.

    And yes, is very dense and a bit difficult to read so, some concentration is needed.

    However it looks like a promising read. Its funny; the description of the characters and the sarcasm that lies under the description of the narrator and his family…

    Probably is a good reading for summer holidays, relaxing at the afternoon. I’ll try, promise…

    Best regards!

    Carles Segura

  5. Hello all,

    I’m sorry but this time I won’t be able to attend our meeting either. I have to take care of the children because we leave tomorrow morning for some days. Maybe I’ll come just for a moment to pick the new book.

    Anyway I have to admit this time I have not finished the book, I started it but it was very dense and boring for me so I let many days pass and then I had no time to finish it until our meeting.

    I’m sure the next novel will be nice!

    Have a nice holidays!

    Ramon

  6. HI mates!
    Last meeting we were 4 people, all women and any of us could well read this oldest book except Josefina who decided finishing it before the new one.
    Have a Happy Easter!
    Lali.

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